The Importance of Public-Private Partnerships

INside

  • 2012 Obama Administration PPP to prevent health care fraud: NICB continues to share information with many of these partners in the battle against health care fraud.
  • Over the last few years, multiple NICB analysts have participated in the DHS Public-Private Analytic Exchange Program (AEP). 
  • NICB agents and analysts participate in PPPs at the local level on a regular basis.
The Importance of Public-Private Partnerships

By Chris Longino 

NICB has prided itself in information sharing between insurers and law enforcement since its inception, and it’s this collaborative spirit that has branched out to many other groups in which NICB is involved, both public and private. 

Defining the PPP
The National Council for Public-Private Partnership (NCPPP) defines Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) as “a contractual agreement between a public agency (federal, state, or local) and a private sector entity. Through this agreement, the skills and assets of each sector (public and private) are shared in delivering a service or facility for the use of the general public. In addition to the sharing of resources, each party shares in the risks and rewards potential in the delivery of the service and/or facility.” PPPs are created in areas where a cooperative effort between government agencies and private entities provides efficiencies to tackle important societal issues.

Partnering on Crime
PPPs designed to combat crime have become increasingly prevalent in recent years as governments seek innovative ways to enhance public safety and address complex criminal challenges. These partnerships involve collaboration between government agencies and private sector organizations to develop and implement strategies, technologies, and initiatives aimed at preventing and reducing crime. These PPPs gained momentum in the early 2000s following the September 11th terrorist attacks. In order to better combat terrorism, law enforcement agencies realized the need to share intelligence and resources with private entities.

In recent years, PPPs have increasingly included private entities involved in financial services and cybersecurity. Law enforcement efforts to combat money laundering require cooperation from the banking industry and other businesses providing financial services. Protected by the Patriot Act, financial institutions share information with law enforcement agencies to detect money laundering and terrorist activities. As cybercrime becomes a growing concern, PPPs addressing cybersecurity issues continue to form. According to the Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency (CISA), “Partnerships between the public and private sectors that foster information sharing are essential to protecting critical infrastructure and to furthering cybersecurity.”

NICB Participation in PPPs
In 2012, the Obama Administration announced the formation of a PPP intended to prevent health care fraud. This PPP included NICB, private health insurers, the FBI, the United States Department of Health and Human Services, the National Association of Medicaid Fraud Control Units, the National Health Care Anti-Fraud Association, and other related entities. The purpose of this PPP is to “share information and best practices in order to improve detection and prevent payment of fraudulent health care billings.” NICB continues to share information with many of these partners in the battle against health care fraud.

As NICB continues to enhance our intelligence and analytical resources and capabilities, expanding the expertise and experience of NICB intelligence analysts is crucial. A PPP with the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) provided such an experience. Over the last few years, multiple NICB analysts have participated in the DHS Public-Private Analytic Exchange Program (AEP). This program allows DHS and NICB analysts to collaborate on analytical products of mutual interest, which provides important experience for the NICB analyst and further solidifies NICB and DHS relationships.

Outside of national PPP programs, NICB agents and analysts participate in PPPs at the local level on a regular basis. Whether through partnerships with local law enforcement agencies or associations designed to promote information sharing, NICB depends on these PPPs to further our mission to combat and prevent insurance fraud. 

Anyone with information concerning insurance fraud or vehicle theft can report it anonymously by calling toll-free 800.TEL.NICB (800.835.6422) or submitting a form on our website.

About the National Insurance Crime Bureau: Headquartered in Oak Brook, Ill., the NICB is the nation's leading not-for-profit organization exclusively dedicated to combatting and preventing insurance crime through Intelligence, Analytics, and Operations; Education and Crime Prevention; and Strategy, Policy, and Advocacy. The NICB is supported by more than 1,200 property-casualty insurers, self-insureds, rental car, vehicle finance, and auto auctions. To learn more, visit www.nicb.org.